Lofting

Ready to lay a piece of plywood on top of the nail heads for transferring the frame shape from the loft floor to a pattern.
Ready to lay a piece of plywood on top of the nail heads for transferring the frame shape from the loft floor to a pattern.

Lofting is essentially scaling up the three views on the drawing (Profile, Deck Plan and Body Plan) to full size, preferably on a nice flat floor. Books, and many chapters, have been written on the subject. See Howard I. Chapelle’s “Boatbuilding” (W. W. Norton & Co, 1941) or Larry Pardey’s “Details of Classic Boat Construction – The Hull” (W. W. Norton & Co, 1991). It’s an iterative process, going back and forth between the three views, smoothing out lumps in the curves and reconciling one view with the other two. Just to make things even more interesting, all three views are superimposed on top of one another. When you’re done, you have probably corrected small inaccuracies in the drawing and Table of Offsets, which are inevitable because of the scale to which the drawings are made. You have full size lines from which to make patterns. And perhaps most importantly, you will have a much better understanding of how you are going to build her.

In his book “Boatbuilding,” Chapelle says “…there was never a boat built in which too much lofting had been done.” I took this to heart – lofting took 6 months!

(NOTE: For latest work on the boat, check the Planking page.)

 

Most photos are captioned to explain the process. Click on any photo to enlarge and scroll through the gallery.

Comments on either the website or the boat will be greatly appreciated. You can contact me (Mike Danesi) at mnldanesi@gmail.com.